The Iron Man

Age Range: 5 - 11

Mankind must put a stop to the dreadful destruction by the Iron Man and set a trap for him, but he cannot be kept down. Then, when a terrible monster from outer space threatens to lay waste to the planet, it is the Iron Man who finds a way to save the world.


Book Author: Ted Hughes

See More Books from this author

Teaching Ideas and Resources:

English

  • Read the first paragraph of the story and imagine the answers to the questions? How far had he walked? Where had he come from? How was he made?
  • The first few pages of the story include a mixture of long and short sentences. Why has the author done this?
  • Rewrite the first chapter of the story from the Iron Man's point of view.
  • Read the author's description of the Iron Man. Can you draw a picture of the Iron Man and use these descriptions as labels to show the different body parts?
  • Create a diary entry from Hogarth's point of view for the day that he first meets the Iron Man.
  • Make a list of words and phrases that the author uses to describe the locations in the story.
  • Use speech marks to write the conversation between Hogarth and his dad, when Hogarth explains that he has seen an Iron Man.
  • Can you find any examples of similes within the book?
  • Write a newspaper article that reports on the farmers digging the enormous hole.
  • The author includes lots of questions in Chapter Two. Why has he done this?
  • Plan and record a radio news report about the space-bat-angel-dragon's landing in Australia.
  • Create a set of instructions to explain how to put the Iron Man back together after he has been transported to Australia.
  • Use the robot paper templates to create profiles of different robots or to write a new robot story?(see Resources below).
  • Look at the robot illustrations?(see Resources below)?and write about each one. What special skills do they have? What adventures might they have?
  • Read The Iron Woman. How are the stories similar / different?
  • Watch The Iron Giant, which is based on the book. Which version of the story do you prefer?

Maths

  • The Iron Man is taller than a house? How tall is this? What units of measurement might be sensible for measuring things taller than a house?

Science

  • Think about the properties of different materials. What might have happened if the 'Iron Man' was made of wood, plastic, fabric or jelly? Plan an experiment to test the strength of different materials.
  • The Iron Man likes eating metal. How many different types of metal can you think of? Can you plan a tasty meal for him using different metal objects?
  • Astronomers spot the growing star in the Constellation of Orion. Can you find any other constellations?
  • The Iron Man's challenge at the end of the story involves laying on some flames. What happens when different materials are heated? Why do they change in these ways?

Computing

  • Use a drawing package to create your own illustration of an Iron Man / Woman.
  • Make a stop motion animation based on the story or about another robot. Look at these examples for inspiration:

Design Technology

  • Use craft materials to make your own robot model... or could you make a life-sized robot?

Art

  • Look at the illustrations in the book. How have they been created? Can you create some pictures, based on the events of the book, in a similar style?
  • Lots of the illustrations include silhouettes. Can you create your own silhouette pictures?
  • Draw a picture of the space-bat-angel-dragon that lands in Australia.

Music

  • Compose the song that the space-bat-angel-dragon might sing every night as he flies around the Earth.

Geography

  • Draw a map showing the locations within the story.
  • Use a map / atlas to find locations where the story might have taken place.
  • The family who have a picnic on the hill feel an earthquake. Can you find out what causes earthquakes?

PSHE

  • The Iron Man helps the world to become more peaceful. Think of ways that we can help to encourage people and countries to live more peacefully alongside each other.

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