The First Splodge

Age Range: 5 - 11

Once upon a slime, there was a Slodge. The first Slodge in the universe. She saw the first moon and stars, the first fruits and flowers. “Mine, all mine!” she said. But what if there was not just one Slodge . . . but two?


Book Author: Jeanne Willis

See More Books from this author

Teaching Ideas and Resources:

English

  • Discuss the title of the book without looking at the cover / illustrations. What might a Slodge be? Could you write a new story about a Slodge?
  • Retell the story from the point of view of the first Slodge.
  • Think of some speech / thought bubbles to accompany the illustrations.
  • The characters learn that it is important to share. Can you write your own story in which the characters learn about sharing?

Science

  • Look at the illustrations (at the beginning of the book) that show the growth of the Slodge. Can you find out more about how plants and animals grow? What do they need to grow? Can you write a report about the growth of a particular plant / animal?
  • Write a report about a Slodge. Where do they live? What do they eat? How are they adapted to their habitat?

Computing

  • Design a game in which a Slodge has to catch a fruit (or escape from a Snawk).

Design Technology

  • Create a model of a Slodge, Snawk or another creature living in this world.

Art

  • Draw your own pictures that show what a ‘Slodge’ might look like.
  • Design a new animal that lives in the came place as the slodges and the Snawk.
  • Create a comic strip version of this story.

PSHE

  • The two slodges fight over the fruit. What would have been a better thing to do?
  • The slodges become friends when they help each other and share the fruit. Can you think of other things that friends should do for each other?

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